How does the egg freezing process work and is it different for women who are virgins?

I am 30-year-old virgin. I don't know when I will meet Mr. Right and become married, so I am concerned about my ability to have children in the future. I have considered freezing my eggs. How does the process work and is it different for women who are virgins?

ANSWERS FROM DOCTORS (5)


Answered by Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group

The process is no different, and it does not matter as to whether the woman has been sexually active in the past or not.

Published on Mar 05, 2015

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Answered by Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group

The process is no different, and it does not matter as to whether the woman has been sexually active in the past or not.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Fertility Physicians of Northern California

Egg freezing has had increased interest in recent years because the egg freezing process, called vitrification, has improved significantly. However, there are many medical, psychological, sociological, economic and other factors that must be considered in making a decision to undergo egg freezing. It is important to discuss this option with a knowledgeable physician and to understand that there can never be a guarantee that the procedure will eventually result in a baby. The chances for success depend on multiple factors, especially the woman's age and the number and quality of eggs that are frozen.

The procedure involves an in vitro fertilization cycle in which the ovaries are stimulated with hormones to produce multiple eggs. These are retrieved in a minor surgical procedure with conscious sedation. Usually a transvaginal ultrasound is used to guide a small needle into the follicles in the ovaries, from which the eggs are aspirated. They are then identified by the embryologist under a microscope, prepared and then frozen in liquid nitrogen and placed in liquid nitrogen cryotanks. Eggs can be kept frozen for many years. The process would be the same for a virgin as someone who is not, with the possible exception that if the status of the hymen was such that the ultrasound could not be placed through it into the vagina, it might be necessary to retrieve the eggs using an abdominal ultrasound and needle, or even doing a laparoscopy (placing a small telescope into the abdominal cavity just under the umbilicus) to get the eggs.

Published on Mar 04, 2015

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Answered by Fertility Physicians of Northern California

Egg freezing has had increased interest in recent years because the egg freezing process, called vitrification, has improved significantly. However, there are many medical, psychological, sociological, economic and other factors that must be considered in making a decision to undergo egg freezing. It is important to discuss this option with a knowledgeable physician and to understand that there can never be a guarantee that the procedure will eventually result in a baby. The chances for success depend on multiple factors, especially the woman's age and the number and quality of eggs that are frozen.

The procedure involves an in vitro fertilization cycle in which the ovaries are stimulated with hormones to produce multiple eggs. These are retrieved in a minor surgical procedure with conscious sedation. Usually a transvaginal ultrasound is used to guide a small needle into the follicles in the ovaries, from which the eggs are aspirated. They are then identified by the embryologist under a microscope, prepared and then frozen in liquid nitrogen and placed in liquid nitrogen cryotanks. Eggs can be kept frozen for many years. The process would be the same for a virgin as someone who is not, with the possible exception that if the status of the hymen was such that the ultrasound could not be placed through it into the vagina, it might be necessary to retrieve the eggs using an abdominal ultrasound and needle, or even doing a laparoscopy (placing a small telescope into the abdominal cavity just under the umbilicus) to get the eggs.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by RMA of Texas

The process is relatively simple and safe. But first I want to commend you for thinking ahead. Not many women your age are so forward-thinking when it comes to considering cryopreserving their eggs. To put the process simply, we give you some medications on a daily basis for approximately 10 days and then under general sedation (you don't feel anything), we aspirate eggs via the vagina with an ultrasound device.

Published on Mar 03, 2015

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Answered by RMA of Texas

The process is relatively simple and safe. But first I want to commend you for thinking ahead. Not many women your age are so forward-thinking when it comes to considering cryopreserving their eggs. To put the process simply, we give you some medications on a daily basis for approximately 10 days and then under general sedation (you don't feel anything), we aspirate eggs via the vagina with an ultrasound device.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Sanford Health Fertility and Reproductive Medicine

Your best option is to have a consultation with a reproductive endocrinologist. He or she will give you your best options. Egg freezing is the same for any woman, regardless of whether she is a virgin or not.

Published on Mar 03, 2015

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Answered by Sanford Health Fertility and Reproductive Medicine

Your best option is to have a consultation with a reproductive endocrinologist. He or she will give you your best options. Egg freezing is the same for any woman, regardless of whether she is a virgin or not.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by South Florida Institute For Reproductive Medicine - Pembroke Pines

Hi, you would be the perfect candidate to freeze your eggs.The process works very well as the freezing process for a woman's eggs is better than ever. You will need to undergo an in vitro fertilization process where you will be given fertility medications to mature your eggs, after which they will be harvested. As part of the procedure, you will need to have several vaginal ultrasounds to monitor your egg growth. If this is a concern, you should address this with your physician ahead of time. As for your last question, no the process does not differ.

Published on Mar 03, 2015

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Answered by South Florida Institute For Reproductive Medicine - Pembroke Pines

Hi, you would be the perfect candidate to freeze your eggs.The process works very well as the freezing process for a woman's eggs is better than ever. You will need to undergo an in vitro fertilization process where you will be given fertility medications to mature your eggs, after which they will be harvested. As part of the procedure, you will need to have several vaginal ultrasounds to monitor your egg growth. If this is a concern, you should address this with your physician ahead of time. As for your last question, no the process does not differ.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


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