How do I become an egg donor?

Answers from doctors (2)


Center for Fertility & Reproductive Endocrinology

Published on Dec 01, 2015

The process for becoming a screened and eligible oocyte donor varies from practice to practice, but in some fashion, these procedures are generally consistent: fill out an application (online or on paper), providing a concise and comprehensive medical and genetic history for you and your family, as well as providing general information about yourself and why you are interested in donating. This is often called a "profile." Once your profile is accepted (reviewed and determined that there is no obvious reason why you should not be a donor), the screening procedures are started. Screening often includes: psychological testing and or evaluation; testing to see that you will produce eggs normally in response to medications ("ovarian reserve testing"); meeting with an REI specialist (MD) to review risks and benefits; genetic testing (blood work) and/or a screening with a genetics counselor; a comprehensive medical examination; screening for risk factors for infectious diseases and laboratory testing for infectious diseases, and usually a screen for recreational drugs. Once everything that your clinic requires has been completed, you would be matched with a recipient couple (if doing a traditional, "live", synchronized donor cycle), OR if you were already matched (like through an agency) then the cycle would be coordinated by the staff at the fertility clinic, OR, if you are being accepted to donate eggs for them to be frozen for later use, then the clinic would coordinate the treatment cycle. All of these types of donation cycles requires you to sign medical consent forms, learn to use the medications, and make sure you understand how the treatment cycle works (appointments, how long it will take, etc...).

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Answered by Center for Fertility & Reproductive Endocrinology

The process for becoming a screened and eligible oocyte donor varies from practice to practice, but in some fashion, these procedures are generally consistent: fill out an application (online or on paper), providing a concise and comprehensive medical and genetic history for you and your family, as well as providing general information about yourself and why you are interested in donating. This is often called a "profile." Once your profile is accepted (reviewed and determined that there is no obvious reason why you should not be a donor), the screening procedures are started. Screening often includes: psychological testing and or evaluation; testing to see that you will produce eggs normally in response to medications ("ovarian reserve testing"); meeting with an REI specialist (MD) to review risks and benefits; genetic testing (blood work) and/or a screening with a genetics counselor; a comprehensive medical examination; screening for risk factors for infectious diseases and laboratory testing for infectious diseases, and usually a screen for recreational drugs. Once everything that your clinic requires has been completed, you would be matched with a recipient couple (if doing a traditional, "live", synchronized donor cycle), OR if you were already matched (like through an agency) then the cycle would be coordinated by the staff at the fertility clinic, OR, if you are being accepted to donate eggs for them to be frozen for later use, then the clinic would coordinate the treatment cycle. All of these types of donation cycles requires you to sign medical consent forms, learn to use the medications, and make sure you understand how the treatment cycle works (appointments, how long it will take, etc...).

Published on Jul 11, 2012


South Florida Institute For Reproductive Medicine - Pembroke Pines

Published on Dec 01, 2015

You need to be qualified through an IVF clinic or donor egg agency. Contact one in your region to learn more about the process and to determine if you are eligible.

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Answered by South Florida Institute For Reproductive Medicine - Pembroke Pines

You need to be qualified through an IVF clinic or donor egg agency. Contact one in your region to learn more about the process and to determine if you are eligible.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


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