I had my tubes clamped but they were removed, is it possible for me to get pregnant if I was told that I have a lot of scar tissue?

I had my tubes clamped 10 yrs ago but they were removed. I was told afterwards that I had a lot of scar tissue. Is it possible for me to get pregnant (naturally) now that they have been removed, or do I need a tubal reversal or some other procedure to rid the scar tissue? Again, my tubes were clamped not cut.

ANSWERS FROM DOCTORS (7)


Answered by IVF LA Reproductive Associates

I am not clear what your question is? If you tubes were clamped or cut, whether there is scar tissue or not, you still may be a candidate for a tubal reversal. However, you also wrote I assume regarding your tubes, "now that they have been removed." If your tubes were removed, your only option is In Vitro Fertilization.

Published on Feb 19, 2015

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Answered by IVF LA Reproductive Associates

I am not clear what your question is? If you tubes were clamped or cut, whether there is scar tissue or not, you still may be a candidate for a tubal reversal. However, you also wrote I assume regarding your tubes, "now that they have been removed." If your tubes were removed, your only option is In Vitro Fertilization.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Southern California Reproductive Center

IVF is the most successful treatment if you have scar tissue and tube removed.

Published on Feb 19, 2015

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Answered by Southern California Reproductive Center

IVF is the most successful treatment if you have scar tissue and tube removed.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Sanford Health Fertility and Reproductive Medicine

Thank you for the email. There are many things to consider when deciding if a tubal reversal is the right choice for you and your family.

The obvious advantage with a tubal reversal is the hope that you will be able to achieve pregnancy with no interventions. The typical estimate is that, if everything goes well and all things are optimal, about 75 percent of women will achieve pregnancy within their 1st year of trying. If there are any factors that are not optimal, the chances for success can be significantly lower.

Here are some things to consider:

• Before a tubal reversal should take place, we first need to know if it is a good option. For example, we need to think about egg quality, your age, tubal status, endocrine status, and it is very important to know what the sperm quality is of the male partner. The consultation fee will vary depending on the facility and they may or may not include fees for lab testing on both partners.

• If you are determined to be a good candidate, surgery will need to take place. The success of the surgery can often not be determined until after the surgery. For example, what conditions are the tubes in and is there any scar tissue or endometriosis. The cost of surgery is typically between $18,000-$24,000. Again, this varies between facilities. There are cheaper rates posted on the Internet, but often they are not including the hospital fees. The surgery typically requires 6-8 weeks of leave from work due to the open incision.

• If the reversal is “successful," the chance of success is still not ensured. For example, there is an increased risk for ectopic pregnancy.

• After a reversal, you will also have to consider birth control options (e.g. contraception vs. tubes tied again)

The other option is obviously IVF. The benefits of IVF are:
• Cost typically is less than 12-15K on average
• Many variables can be worked around
• Success rate each month is much greater
• Options for prevention of genetic disease through new genetic screening
• Option to screen embryos for chromosome or genetic conditions to decrease the chance for having a baby with a syndrome, or a miscarriage, through a process called preimplantation genetic testing

There are obviously drawbacks as well:
• Requires medication for stimulation
• It is not the “natural” option that some couples desire

There is much to consider prior to deciding what is the best option. The first step is a consultation with a fertility specialist to discuss your history and start your lab work up. From there, you will be advised on the options that best fit your needs.




Published on Feb 19, 2015

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1855_1416362395.jpg
Answered by Sanford Health Fertility and Reproductive Medicine

Thank you for the email. There are many things to consider when deciding if a tubal reversal is the right choice for you and your family.

The obvious advantage with a tubal reversal is the hope that you will be able to achieve pregnancy with no interventions. The typical estimate is that, if everything goes well and all things are optimal, about 75 percent of women will achieve pregnancy within their 1st year of trying. If there are any factors that are not optimal, the chances for success can be significantly lower.

Here are some things to consider:

• Before a tubal reversal should take place, we first need to know if it is a good option. For example, we need to think about egg quality, your age, tubal status, endocrine status, and it is very important to know what the sperm quality is of the male partner. The consultation fee will vary depending on the facility and they may or may not include fees for lab testing on both partners.

• If you are determined to be a good candidate, surgery will need to take place. The success of the surgery can often not be determined until after the surgery. For example, what conditions are the tubes in and is there any scar tissue or endometriosis. The cost of surgery is typically between $18,000-$24,000. Again, this varies between facilities. There are cheaper rates posted on the Internet, but often they are not including the hospital fees. The surgery typically requires 6-8 weeks of leave from work due to the open incision.

• If the reversal is “successful," the chance of success is still not ensured. For example, there is an increased risk for ectopic pregnancy.

• After a reversal, you will also have to consider birth control options (e.g. contraception vs. tubes tied again)

The other option is obviously IVF. The benefits of IVF are:
• Cost typically is less than 12-15K on average
• Many variables can be worked around
• Success rate each month is much greater
• Options for prevention of genetic disease through new genetic screening
• Option to screen embryos for chromosome or genetic conditions to decrease the chance for having a baby with a syndrome, or a miscarriage, through a process called preimplantation genetic testing

There are obviously drawbacks as well:
• Requires medication for stimulation
• It is not the “natural” option that some couples desire

There is much to consider prior to deciding what is the best option. The first step is a consultation with a fertility specialist to discuss your history and start your lab work up. From there, you will be advised on the options that best fit your needs.




Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by The Fertility Center of the Carolinas

I assume that when you say "they've been removed" you mean you had the "clamps" removed? If your tubes are removed you obviously won't get pregnant naturally. Because of the time frame of the initial surgery (10yrs) and the description of the scar tissue, in vitro fertilization (IVF) would most likely be your best option at pregnancy. You can always have a hysterosalpingogram (HSG) done to determine if your tubes are open and not dilated.

Published on Feb 19, 2015

Answered by The Fertility Center of the Carolinas (View Profile)

I assume that when you say "they've been removed" you mean you had the "clamps" removed? If your tubes are removed you obviously won't get pregnant naturally. Because of the time frame of the initial surgery (10yrs) and the description of the scar tissue, in vitro fertilization (IVF) would most likely be your best option at pregnancy. You can always have a hysterosalpingogram (HSG) done to determine if your tubes are open and not dilated.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Dr. Mindy Boxer - Acupuncture & Nutrition

With proper medical and naturopathic care, yes, it will be possible to conceive.

Published on Feb 19, 2015

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Answered by Dr. Mindy Boxer - Acupuncture & Nutrition

With proper medical and naturopathic care, yes, it will be possible to conceive.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group

Thank you for your question. We never rule out the possibility of a natural conception after a tubal reversal, but given the fact that you were told that you have a lot of scar tissue may make things more difficult. You did not give us your age, which directly affects your chance of getting pregnant. You may want to consider a consultation with a fertility expert to evaluate your ovarian function, get a HSG done to check tubal patency, and have your partner have a semen analysis

Published on Feb 19, 2015

//imgs-origin.edoctors.com/imageresizer/image/user_uploads/58x58_85-1/doctors/1875_1416362395.jpg
Answered by Piedmont Reproductive Endocrinology Group

Thank you for your question. We never rule out the possibility of a natural conception after a tubal reversal, but given the fact that you were told that you have a lot of scar tissue may make things more difficult. You did not give us your age, which directly affects your chance of getting pregnant. You may want to consider a consultation with a fertility expert to evaluate your ovarian function, get a HSG done to check tubal patency, and have your partner have a semen analysis

Published on Jul 11, 2012


Answered by A Personal Choice Tubal Reversal

If the clamps were removed and the tubes were not surgically rejoined, then you will not become pregnant. You will need to have tubal reversal surgery.

Published on Feb 19, 2015

Answered by A Personal Choice Tubal Reversal (View Profile)

If the clamps were removed and the tubes were not surgically rejoined, then you will not become pregnant. You will need to have tubal reversal surgery.

Published on Jul 11, 2012


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